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A New Small Bariatric Surgery

Comments from our nutritionist, Yunman Liu:

gastric tube feedingThis device works the opposite way than gastric tube feeding does, and shares the similar symptoms with dumping syndrome in which food and gastric juices from your stomach move to your small intestine in an uncontrolled, abnormally fast manner after gastric bypass.

Although patients in the experiment using AspireAssist lost an average of 12.1 percent of their total body weight compared to 3.6 percent for the control patients in one year, if they do not reestablish their eating habit and manage their portion size by self-monitoring and lifestyle change, they would get nowhere health improvement.

The article is from the following link:

http://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/lana-hirschowitz/if-you-could-eat-what-you-wanted-and-lose-weight-would-you/?utm_hp_ref=au-homepage

FYI (excerpts from FDA statement of AspireAssist):

The AspireAssist device should not be used on patients with eating disorders, and it is not intended to be used for short durations in those who are moderately overweight. It is intended to assist in weight loss in patients aged 22 and older who are obese, with a body mass index of 35 to 55, and who have failed to achieve and maintain weight loss through non-surgical weight-loss therapy.

To place the device, surgeons insert a tube in the stomach with an endoscope via a small incision in the abdomen. A disk-shaped port valve that lies outside the body, flush against the skin of the abdomen, is connected to the tube and remains in place. Approximately 20 to 30 minutes after meal consumption, the patient attaches the device’s external connector and tubing to the port valve, opens the valve and drains the contents. Once opened, it takes approximately five to 10 minutes to drain food matter through the tube and into the toilet. The device removes approximately 30 percent of the calories consumed.

Side effects related to use of the AspireAssist include occasional indigestion, nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea.

Risks related to the abdominal opening for the port valve include abdominal discomfort or pain, irritation, hardening or inflammation of the skin around the site where the tube is placed, leakage, bleeding and/or infection around the site where the tube is placed and device migration into the stomach wall. All have the potential to necessitate removal of the device. After device removal, there may be a risk of persistent fistula, an abnormal passageway between the stomach and the abdominal wall.

AspireAssist is contraindicated in those with certain conditions, including uncontrolled hypertension, diagnosed bulimia, diagnosed binge eating disorder, night eating syndrome, certain types of previous abdominal surgery, pregnancy or lactation, inflammatory bowel disease or stomach ulcers. AspireAssist is also contraindicated in patients with a history of serious pulmonary or cardiovascular disease, coagulation disorders, chronic abdominal pain or those at a high risk of medical complications from an endoscopic procedure.

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